Stronger, Safer, More Insurable Horse Industry

horse-insurance

History & Goals of NAHA “NAHA” North American Horsemen’s Association, a Minnesota registered organization, was founded in 1987 in response to specific needs of the horse industry, which were not being met by other organizations. NAHA is an informational, educational, service organization. It is associated with and provides administrative support to Horsemen of North American Safety Control Risk Purchasing Group, a national group insurance program that was formed in 1986, providing quality liability insurance for members who agree to follow the mandatory standards of NAHA’s risk reduction programs.

NAHA was founded in the middle of an insurance industry and liability crisis, which put many horse operations out of business due to a lack of insurance. We didn’t want that to happen again, so a two-legged plan was formed.  First, we promoted the concept of equine activities immunity laws to protect horse owners and business operators from lawsuits and huge payouts for accidents involving the inherent risks of horse activities.  The idea caught on and within a few years, an amazing 46 states had enacted such laws. Secondly, with our expertise in equine practices and equine insurance, we began to write minimum risk reduction standards the horse industry could implement to make it insurable again.  These standards are based upon commonly occurring, but often avoidable, accidents that are either severe or frequent in nature. This concept was also well-accepted, and the standards have been used as models throughout the industry to make it safer….and yes…..insurable.

Our Goals Include:

  • To promote the horse and the horse industry;
  • To work for unity within the horse industry;
  • To establish a reasonable and honest image of horses and horse enthusiasts to the insurance industry and the legal profession and system;
  • To develop insurance programs which could attract the best insurance companies available, and which provide the horse industry with liability insurance that meets its broadly evolving needs and characteristics.
  • To develop and maintain Horse Industry Risk Reduction Standards and Legal Agreement – Release Agreement Models for use by members and their legal council.

Risk Reduction Standards NAHA Risk Reduction Standards have made a huge impact on the safety procedures of the horse industry since 1986. At one time we offered 7 separate sets of standards, but eventually condensed those into three:

  • NAHA Form 265:Risk Reduction Program for Equine Business Owners / Operators
  • NAHA Form 16: Risk Reduction Program for Benevolent Horsemen’s Associations or Clubs and Equine Events, Exhibitions and Competitions
  • NAHA Form 26: Risk Reduction Program for Non-Commercial Personal and / or Pleasure Horse Owners, or Lessees

Contracts and Legal Agreement Models Members will be able to access and implement our agreement models for their business activities. NAHA offers 16 contract models. These agreements have proven to be helpful, important and highly relevant to the industry over many years of implementation across the industry.

North American Horsemen’s Association Code of Ethics

Dedicated Members of the North American Horsemen’s Association Strive To:

  • Appreciate and promote the natural splendor of the horse, all equine species and breeds;
  • Promote human experience, enjoyment and need for the horse;
  • Respect the welfare, safety and property of other people;
  • Respect the welfare and safe, humane handling of horses;
  • Support and subscribe to the risk reduction standards of the North American Horsemen’s Association

Call us today to join the membership of North American Horsemen’s Association: 1-800-328-8894Please see the NAHA Brochure for membership costs and additional information.

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Ark Agency Animal Insurance Services shared University of Minnesota Equine Extension Program's photo. ... See MoreSee Less

Friday Funny! Hats off to a great weekend.

3 days ago  ·  

We highly recommend teaching regular safety training at your stable. One emergency people don't think enough about is how they would free a horse that got a tied lead, cross tie or other type of rope wrapped about the horse's neck, head or halter. There are other situations like this that can happen to other parts of a horse's body - with horses anything can happen and it is good to be prepared --- kinda like knowing where your fire extinguisher is, if it is functional and how to use it.

With a rope emergency, using a knife with a point in an emergency near the neck or head of a panicking horse is not the best idea, and we've found that neither smooth nor serrated blades work fast enough. We just ordered the product attached to this post. Have a look at the video. Let us know if you have used one. We plan to test it on different thicknesses, plies, and types of webbing, rope and leather as in the video and will report on this again soon.

youtu.be/edQdttqfPIg
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2 weeks ago  ·